DIY kitchen twine tassels

kitchen-twine-tassels-mains

As part of the massive DIY that has been our terrace, Giulio and picked up some sturdy looking curtains from Ikea and cajoled my father-in-law into installing them for us.

You’re thinking curtains? On the terrace? Admittedly, it’s a bit strange, but completely necessary. Like most European apartments, we’re situated in the middle of a palazzo jungle. But unlike like most European towns, ours is almost entirely abandoned.

We have no neighbours in the immediate vicinity, just a lot of the palazzos that have been abandoned for years and look truly worse for wear. Since we’re trying to create an urban getaway, we thought we’d kill two birds with one stone and hide the ugly view, while at the same time, infuse the space with a sense of intimacy and privacy.

The curtains look great, but they lack a polished feel especially when they’re open, which is, admittedly, most of the time, so this weekend I made the spur of the moment decision to make tassels.

Since these curtains are outside, I didn’t want the dainty silk string tassels of my mother’s bedroom. I wanted something that looked organic and natural, while being sturdy enough to stand up to the outdoor conditions.

The curtains we have are tan and made from a super thick cotton, so I was naturally drawn to jute tassels. I sat down and started to make one only to realise that the jute thread was far too thick to make tassels.

So I hunted around the house for other supplies and eventually stumbled on some kitchen string. I used the jute for added texture and accented with a darker shade of kitchen string. The entire project took me 15 minutes tops and was super easy.

what-you-need

Equipment assembled, all you need to do is follow 4 steps to make your own tassels.

tassels-steps

1. Wrap your kitchen twine around a stiff piece of cardboard. I used the back of one my IKEA picture frames. Your final tassel will be half the length of the board you use. I wrapped my twine around 15 times to get the desired thickness.

2. Carefully slide your twine off the board and lay over another piece of kitchen twine. You can use a different colour like I did or not. Tie a knot to secure the pieces of string and make sure the knot is positioned in the middle.

3. Cut a piece of jute that’s about 10cm long. Tie a loose knot at one end and lay over the twine. Wrap the other end of the jute around the twine twice and then thread through the loop. Gently pull the loop closed to secure the jute in place.

4. Cut the excess jute off. Tighten the knot again. Snip the loops at the bottom of the tassel and even the lengths if you need to. Tie a knot at the top of the twine loop you made in step two and use it to secure the tassel to your project.

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tassel-2

tassel-1

For a quick weekend project with only the materials I had on hand, I’m really happy with how they turned out. I might try to get my hands on some gold thread and make indoor versions for my bedroom. I’ll keep the kitchen twine, but use the gold thread in the place of the jute.

Thought I’d include a snap or two of my terrace. Isn’t the view terrible?

Hope you’re having a gorgeous week!

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