Tips for taking better blog photos

I’ve learnt a thing or two since I started my blog. But the biggest learning curve was actually all about my photography skills.

I used to be the WORST photographer. I literally would visit a destination and walk while I snapped. I didn’t even slow down to take the picture. This developed into a complete abhorrence of photography, so I would go on holiday and not even take a photo.

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Then I started blogging and realised that photography is super important. In fact, it makes or breaks your blog and it’s not as easy as it sounds. You can’t just point and snap. So I have a few tips to help you become a master blog photographer.

get the good stuff

I use a Canon EOS 1200D camera. It’s definitely not the best out there. It’s middle of the range and cost me €350 on Amazon. If you don’t want to spend the earth, but still take good pictures then need a good camera like this one. If you want to get technical, you can buy filters, lens and lights. But they’re not essential. A light is probably the most important of the three, but you can make do without it, you just have to depend on natural light.

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mix it up

Don’t do all your photography with the same background. Mix it up. I have a plain white background, a black one (which is actually just a mini blackboard) and a grey backdrop that I made with a layer of cement on a piece of MDF. I also take advantages of the surfaces I have at home – so my hardwood table, marble desk and tiled patio. You want to keep your readers engaged and interested in your photography. Plus I find everything looks nicer when photographed on wood.

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add some eye candy

Don’t photograph your project/dish/diy all on its lonesome. Jazz up your photos with some accessories – fresh flowers, knick knacks you have lying around the house, soft fabrics and throws, napkins, cutlery – anything that adds a bit of colour and texture to your photos.

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play with angles

Photos look better vertical. End of story. They also look better when taken with natural light, so never snap a shot with a light on unless you’ve bought a camera light. You don’t know how many times I’ve argued with my husband about this. He always has the kitchen light on when he photographs his dishes and they look terrible.

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befriend photoshop

You can’t really get by without Photoshop, unless you are an amazing photographer. Your three best friends on Photoshop are: automatic tone, automatic colour and automatic contrast. These three buttons under the Image menu are lifesavers because they’ll make your photo look a million times better. If you can’t swing Photoshop, try Pixlr. It’s a free online photo editing software that is a close second.

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get up close and personal

When you’re snapping your photos, try different angles. So don’t just centre whatever you’re photographing in the middle of the frame and be done with it. Get in close and cut off an edge. Get down low and snap the project from underneath. Tilt your camera on an angle and snap away. I take three-four times more photos than I need to make sure I get a good shot. Blog photography isn’t about having one photo, but a handful for each post of the project from different angles so it looks less like a diy and more like a magazine spread.

Happy snapping xx

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